This 14th Century Traveler Will Make You Jump To The Next Flight

This 14th Century Traveler Will Make You Jump To The Next Flight

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 Craving for something new: the powerful urge for or drive to wander or travel and investigate the world. We as a whole experience the ill effects of it now and then - that impulse to abandon everything and take off to investigate the world. However, did you realize that back in the fourteenth century, a medieval Moroccan law scholar, too had an enthusiasm for voyaging? One that lasted for 30 years? One that didn't include lodgings, web-based booking, travel insurance, Visas, and surely, no travel vaccines? Voyaging these days is more secure, less expensive and a great deal easier than it used to be hundreds of years prior, and this is the reason we have much gratefulness for:

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Ibn Battuta is widely recognized as one of the greatest travelers of all time. He lived in the 14th century CE, and left his hometown, Tangier, around June 1325, at the age of 21 for a Mecca pilgrimage - a journey that would normally take sixteen months back at the time. He would return to Morocco several years later.

Mecca

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In the wake of spending the time of Ramadan in Damascus, Ibn Battuta joined a band traveling south to Medina. After four days, he would head for Mecca for his journey. "The people of Mecca are known for many excellent and noble qualities, by their beneficence to the poor and weak, and by their kindness to strangers." -Ibn Battuta

North Africa and Egypt

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Ibn Battuta is widely recognized as one of the greatest travelers of all time. On his way to Mecca, he visited Egypt and made many observations of Cairo: "The city is so crowded that their movements reminds you of waves of the sea… although an old city, it still remains youthful ." -Ibn Battuta said.

The Levant

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In the wake of spending the time of Ramadan in Damascus, Ibn Battuta joined a band traveling south to Medina. After four days, he would head for Mecca for his journey. "If Paradise be on this earth, Damascus it is and none but she; If in the heavens, from her derives its air and its amenity. ‘Fair city and forgiving Lord!’ Enjoy her – swift the hours will flee!" – Ibn Battuta

Iraq

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Ibn Battuta went to Jerusalem and was flabbergasted by the Dome of the Rock, before continuing to Bethlehem. In the wake of spending a month in Mecca, Ibn Battuta made a trip to Iraq. He achieved Najaf before leaving for Wasit, and south to Basra. Months after the fact, he touched base to Baghdad in June 1327. A few sections of the city were as yet demolished from the harm caused by the Invading Mongols driven by Hulago Khan in 1258, he noted, however that didn't prevent him from seeing its magnificence. "Baghdad has so many beautifully constructed baths. Most of the baths are painted with pitch, which looks like black marble. The pitch is brought to Baghdad from a spring located between Basra and Kufa, from which it flows continually." - Ibn Battuta

Persia

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In Perisa, Ibn Battuta went by Isfahan, then traveled south to Shiraz - a vast, thriving city that was fortunately saved destruction from the by the Mongol attack. "I entered Tabriz and came to a great bazaar, the Ghazan bazaar, one of the finest bazaars I have seen in the world. Every type of trade is grouped separately in it. I walked through the jewelers' bazaar, and the varieties of the precious stones displayed there dazzled my eyes ." - Ibn Battuta

Yemen

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When he arrived in Yemen, he went by Zabīd, Ta'izz, and Sana'a, before at long last advancing toward the imperative exchanging port of Aden. From Aden, Ibn Battuta set out on another trip via ocean. "I traveled to Aden on the coast of the ocean. The town is surrounded by mountains and can be reached from one side only. It is a very hot place. There are Indian and Egyptian merchants residing there. The inhabitants are all either merchants, porters, or fishermen." - Ibn Battuta

Somalia, Swahili Coast and Tanzania

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He visited Mogadishu and described it as an exceedingly large trading center serving as an important port. "The city was full of rich merchants, and noted for its high-quality fabric that was exported to other countries, including Egypt." - Ibn Battuta

Modern Day Turkey

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Ibn Battuta's voyages additionally took him to Eğirdir, Konya, Erzurum, Constantinople (Istanbul) and different urban communities in what is presently cutting edge Turkey. Of his visit, he stated: "The Turks could easily leave their livestock free to graze without the need for guards or shepherds. They had very strict laws against stealing" -Ibn Battuta

Uzbekistan and Afghanistan

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Ibn Battuta visited Bukhara and Samarkand in Uzbekistan. From there he proceeded south to Afghanistan, and then India via the snow-covered mountain passes of the Hindu Kush. "We traveled all day long until sunset. We kept spreading clothes in front of the camels for them to tread on, to avoid them sinking in the snow." -Ibn Battuta

India

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The regarded explorer was invited liberally by the Sultan of Delhi. He remained in India for a long time, where he acted as a judge. "We traveled to the town of Calicut (a city in the state of Kerala), which is one of the main ports in Malabar. It is visited by men from China, Jāwa, Ceylon, the Maldives, Yemen and Persia, and there merchants gather from all parts of the world. Its harbor is one of the largest in the world" - Ibn Battuta

Sri Lanka

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Ibn Battuta achieved Ceylon in 1344 close Puttalam (Batthalah) which was a piece of the then-Jaffna kingdom. The Jaffna lord helped him visit Adam's Peak. Ibn Battuta likewise said that pearl plunging was in advance at Puttalam and the ruler gave him a portion of the finest pearls he had ever observed. "In Ceylon, people believed in Buddhism, yet they showed respect for Muslim mystics, invited them to their houses, and offered them food"- Ibn Battuta

China

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Ibn Battuta achieved Ceylon in 1344 close Puttalam (Batthalah) which was a piece of the then-Jaffna kingdom. The Jaffna lord helped him visit Adam's Peak. Ibn Battuta likewise said that pearl plunging was in advance at Puttalam and the ruler gave him a portion of the finest pearls he had ever observed. "The Chinese have three kinds of vessels: Junks which are the large ships, middle-sized ones called zaws, and small ones called kakams. The junks can have up to twelve sails, which are made of bamboo rods plaited like mats" - Ibn Battuta

Mali and Muritania

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After returning to Morocco, and visiting Valencia and Granada in modern-day Spain, Ibn Battuta would begin a new adventure in 1352. He traveled south and crossed the Sahara desert to visit the African kingdom of Mali. "The town of Iwalatan (Oualata In Modern day Mauritania) is very hot. There were some small date-palms and they had sowed watermelons in their shade. Water came from underground waterbeds. The inhabitants wear clothes of fine quality and of Egyptian origin. The women are blessed with exceptional beauty, they are Independent, and are highly respected." -Ibn Battuta

Rihla (The Journey)

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Ibn Battuta reported his travels in a book titled, Rihla (The Journey). The book constitutes a vital record of numerous ranges of the world in the fourteenth century. From each land he went to, Ibn Battuta recorded his encounters and perceptions, giving a one of a kind record on the social traditions, nature, engineering, history, and administration of different parts of the world. His profitable and intriguing record of spots adds to our comprehension of the medieval world. Ibn Battuta finished the book in 1355. He would act as a judge in Morocco for the rest of his life, up until his death in 1368.

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